One Easy Way to Prevent Childhood Obesity in your Family

child drink the fruit juice

With childhood obesity numbers soaring off the charts, many parents are more in tune with what their children are eating and drinking. French fries are being replaced with sweet potato fries and fruit cups, chicken tenders are getting the boot from their healthier grilled self, and sodas are being upgraded to real fruit juice. But, is this upgrade to juice really an upgrade at all?

Even though juice comes from fruit, it is still loaded with sugar and extra calories. Unfortunately, many parents think that this is a healthy option for their kids because of all of the vitamins and minerals juices offer. What they don’t take into consideration is that a single serving of fruit juice has far more calories from sugar than eating a piece of fruit (more than double, actually). And, while chewing an apple actually burns calories, swallowing a calorie-laden beverage like juice doesn’t give your mouth a workout.

Juice is absorbed quickly, and because it is full of liquid sugars, it creates a spike in insulin levels. If consumed in larger amounts regularly, it has the potential to cause childhood obesity and diabetes. Additionally, it lacks the filling fiber that a piece of fruit offers. So even after having consumed 180 calories of juice, your child will probably be hungry again fairly quickly.

Although the American Academy of Pediatrics currently allows for a limited amount of juice (4-6 ounces per day for infants >6 months and 6 ounces twice daily for children) in a child’s daily diet, the recommendation to cut it out altogether may be on the horizon. So while skipping the daily candy bar and soda is a must, limiting the amount of juice your child drinks may be equally important in ensuring their health and preventing childhood obesity.

From,

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Best Grilled Chicken Recipe…EVER!!!!

Grilled Chicken Skewer With SaladSo, I swore that I would never share this recipe! It has been my entertaining go to for several years now, and it is always a hit. Not only is it fairly easy, it is incredibly healthy and delicious. Although it’s primarily meant for summer grilling, I adapt it for the winter months too by baking the chicken instead of grilling it…still delicious!

Mediterranean food is just plain healthy (It’s also my favorite). Give me some tabouli and hummus, and I’m in paradise. Although tandoori is technically an Indian dish, I like to pair it with Mediterranean sidekicks. The yogurt marinade and side sauce make the ensemble work deliciously. Even if you don’t usually gravitate toward ethnic foods, give it a try. Your taste buds may surprise you. My sidekicks for this chicken dish include rice pilaf, tabouli, pita and hummus, and a watermelon/mint salad for dessert. Here is my version adapted from the Williams-Sonoma Complete Grilling Cookbook.

The Chicken Marinade: 

3/4 cups plain yogurt

4 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

4 tablespoons olive oil

1 1/2 tablespoon minced garlic

1 tablespoon curry powder

1 tablespoon ground turmeric

1 teaspoon salt (optional)

1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper

4-5 boneless skinless chicken breasts (I often double the recipe for company)

Chicken Directions: 

Mix all of the above ingredients together in a bowl. Using a knife, score the chicken (make small cuts into the meat). Place flat in a dish and pour the above marinade over the meat, coating both sides completely. Cover and refrigerate for a few hours (overnight is even better). Get the grill going, and throw the chicken on. Use the left over marinade to re-coat the chicken when you flip it. Cook on grill until fully cooked (approx. 20-30 min).

The Side Sauce:

1 cucumber chopped

1 cup plain yogurt

1/4 cup chopped fresh mint

1/2 teaspoon salt (optional)

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Side Sauce Directions: 

Simply mix it all together and serve it on top of the chicken or on the side as a dipping sauce for the chicken.

Enjoy!!

From,

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Coconut Oil: Is your body really all that crazy about the “Craze”?

Coconuts And Organic Coconut OilWhen my mother-in-law informed me that coconut oil was part of her new diet plan, and my husband announced that he wanted to try a coconut oil chicken recipe from a men’s health magazine, I began to wonder if olive oil really should get the boot from a new-found “healthier” option. Instead of joining the coconut oil craze, I decided to do some hardcore research on the subject for myself-Nothing better than a little reading on the organics and biochemistry of fats!

Plain and simple, coconut oil is a FAT! It is not a weight loss food. It has the same amount of calories as any other fat. Yes, it is a better option than butter and other trans fats because it doesn’t contain any cholesterol, but it doesn’t beat olive oil or other plant-based oils. In fact, coconut oil can still potentially increase your risk for heart disease because it is high in saturated fat (the “bad” kind of fat that you should avoid in your daily diet). Not only is it high in saturated fat…it has the HIGHEST amount of saturated fat of any fat at 92%. I am not saying to avoid all fat in your diet. Fat is necessary for our bodies to function, but in the right daily amounts.IMG_2043

So, why the “Craze”? Does coconut oil really cure cancer, lead to immediate weight loss, and give you a fool-proof immune system? If only!  Coconut oil is an interesting little fat. Although it is high in saturated fat and should be limited in the diet for this reason, it does have some unique properties that may offer some health benefits. Coconut oil is made up of fatty acids. Unlike other fats, the main contributors are a mix of short and medium chain fatty acids, predominantly lauric and myristic acids. It is thought that this mixture may be the reason why coconut oil actually helps to increase HDL (or good cholesterol) in the body. Even though it may give your good cholesterol a strong boost, it will also increase your LDL (or BAD cholesterol). Another positive of coconut oil is its plant-based origin. Plant based products offer antioxidant properties, and coconut oil probably also contains some healthy chemicals that researchers haven’t yet identified. Studies are currently looking at coconut oil’s impact on Alzheimer’s and other diseases, but it is far too early to say that it is a “cure-all”.IMG_2041

So, although it may be tempting to dump your olive oil down the drain, DON’T DO IT! Olive Oil is still a healthier fat option for your heart and your waistline as far as we know. It’s okay to use coconut oil every now and then for a flavorful treat, but DON’T make it your “go to” fat. If you love to bake and are looking for a healthier alternative to butter, then coconut oil is a good alternative. This won’t make your double chocolate chip cookies low-fat, but it might make them just a little bit healthier!

Check out the hyperlinks for more supporting evidence from Harvard, The Cleveland Clinic, and Johns Hopkins.

From The Mom in Me, MD

Every Foodie’s Favorite Turkey Burger…or at least it should be!

Group Of Friends Having Outdoor Barbeque At HomeIf you are looking for a healthy alternative to burgers on the grill…look no further! Don’t be fooled! This isn’t your typical turkey burger. Your inner foodie is going to love it! This one is also a modified version taken from The Williams-Sonoma Complete Grilling Cookbook. 

The most important part for making sure it is truly a healthier option is your ground turkey choice. Make sure that you look for ground turkey breast. This is a much leaner option. Most packages will tell you the fat content as well. Although ground turkey does come 99% fat-free extra lean, using this meat on the grill may result in a pretty dry burger. Consider opting up for a little more fat with the 97% fat-free lean to keep some juiciness.

Again, I’m “dishing” all my secret recipes! I decided it was a little selfish to keep them all to myself. Let me introduce you to…

Gourmet Turkey Burgers with Apple-Mint Relish:

The Burgers:

2lbs of ground turkey breast (lean)

1 cup 2% shredded cheddar cheese

1/4 cup scallions or green onion

1 clove minced garlic or 1 tablespoon

1 1/2 tsp salt (optional)

1/2 tsp fresh ground pepper

Mix it all together (I always use my hands). Make your patties and throw them on the grill. Turn them a few times and cook all the way through. Undercooked turkey is not a good idea!

The Apple-Mint Relish:

2 apples (usually either Golden Delicious or Fuji work best) finely diced

1/4 cup apple cider vinegar

2 tablespoons fresh mint

1 tablespoon sugar

1 tablespoon olive oil

1/2 teaspoon celery seeds

1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds

Toss it all together to make your relish. Put it in the refrigerator for a couple of hours to let the flavors come together.

Putting it all together:

You can choose any bun or bread, but I love to use homemade onion rolls (most grocery stores carry these in the bakery section). Throw on the burger, layer on some spinach instead of lettuce, and then top it with your apple-mint relish. Finally, spread some Dijon Mustard on the top bun and presto! The only problem with these burgers is that they are a mouth full! I like to pair these with sweet potato fries or grilled corn on the cob and a fruit salad.

From The Mom in Me, MD

 

 

 

 

Healthy Summer Eats: Tandoori Chicken on the Grill!

Grilled Chicken Skewer With SaladSo, I swore that I would never share this recipe! It has been my entertaining go to for several years now, and it is always a hit. Not only is it fairly easy, it is incredibly healthy and delicious. Although it’s primarily meant for summer grilling, I adapt it for the winter months too by baking the chicken instead of grilling it…still delicious!

Mediterranean food is just plain healthy (It’s also my favorite). Give me some tabouli and hummus, and I’m in paradise. Although tandoori is technically an Indian dish, I like to pair it with Mediterranean sidekicks. The yogurt marinade and side sauce make the ensemble work deliciously. Even if you don’t usually gravitate toward ethnic foods, give it a try. Your taste buds may surprise you. My sidekicks for this chicken dish include rice pilaf, tabouli, pita and hummus, and a watermelon/mint salad for dessert. Here is my version adapted from the Williams-Sonoma Complete Grilling Cookbook.

The Chicken Marinade: 

3/4 cups plain yogurt

4 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

4 tablespoons olive oil

1 1/2 tablespoon minced garlic

1 tablespoon curry powder

1 tablespoon ground turmeric

1 teaspoon salt (optional)

1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper

4-5 boneless skinless chicken breasts (I often double the recipe for company)

Chicken Directions: 

Mix all of the above ingredients together in a bowl. Using a knife, score the chicken (make small cuts into the meat). Place flat in a dish and pour the above marinade over the meat, coating both sides completely. Cover and refrigerate for a few hours (overnight is even better). Get the grill going, and throw the chicken on. Use the left over marinade to re-coat the chicken when you flip it. Cook on grill until fully cooked (approx. 20-30 min).

The Side Sauce:

1 cucumber chopped

1 cup plain yogurt

1/4 cup chopped fresh mint

1/2 teaspoon salt (optional)

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Side Sauce Directions: 

Simply mix it all together and serve it on top of the chicken or on the side as a dipping sauce for the chicken.

Enjoy!!

From The Mom in Me, MD

 

 

 

 

Is 100% Real Fruit Juice as Healthy as it Seems?

child drink the fruit juice

With childhood obesity numbers soaring off the charts, many parents are more in tune with what their children are eating and drinking. French fries are being replaced with sweet potato fries and fruit cups, chicken tenders are getting the boot from their healthier grilled self, and sodas are being upgraded to real fruit juice. But, is this upgrade to juice really an upgrade at all?

Even though juice comes from fruit, it is still loaded with sugar and extra calories. Unfortunately, many parents think that this is a healthy option for their kids because of all of the vitamins and minerals juices offer. What they don’t take into consideration is that a single serving of fruit juice has far more calories from sugar than eating a piece of fruit (more than double, actually). And, while chewing an apple actually burns calories, swallowing a calorie-laden beverage like juice doesn’t give your mouth a workout.

Juice is absorbed quickly, and because it is full of liquid sugars, it creates a spike in insulin levels. If consumed in larger amounts regularly, it has the potential to cause childhood obesity and diabetes. Additionally, it lacks the filling fiber that a piece of fruit offers. So even after having consumed 180 calories of juice, your child will probably be hungry again fairly quickly.

Although the American Academy of Pediatrics currently allows for a limited amount of juice (4-6 ounces per day for infants >6 months and 6 ounces twice daily for children) in a child’s daily diet, the recommendation to cut it out altogether may be on the horizon. So while skipping the daily candy bar and soda is a must, limiting the amount of juice your child drinks may be equally important in ensuring their health and preventing childhood obesity.

From The Mom In Me, MD